The measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world. Audio Book Review: THE MEASURE OF ALL THINGS: The Seven 2019-02-07

The measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world Rating: 7,4/10 1450 reviews

The Measure of All Things: The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

One Englishman, traveling through France on the eve of the Revolution, found the diversity there a torment. Starting in Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre would make his way north to Dunkirk, while Pierre-Francois-Andre Mechain voyaged south to Barcelona. But all the savants' grand plans would have remained fantasy had not the French Revolution -- history's great utopian rupture -- provided them with an unexpected chance to throw off the shackles of custom and build a new world upon principled foundations. Now he mocked the global aspirations of the men he had once admired. The meter would be eternal because it had been taken from the earth, which was itself eternal.

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The Measure of All Things : The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

Their grander ambition was to transform France -- and ultimately, the whole world -- into a free market for the open exchange of goods and information. Starting in Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre would make his way north to Dunkirk, while Pierre-François-André Méchain voyaged south to Barcelona. In place of this Babel of measurement, the savants imagined a universal language of measures that would bring order and reason to the exchange of both goods and information. Their mission was to measure the world, or at least that piece of the meridian arc which ran from Dunkerque through Paris to Barcelona. The spine may show signs of wear. It would be a rational and coherent system that would induce its users to think about the world in a rational and coherent way.

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Audio Book Review: THE MEASURE OF ALL THINGS: The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

For those who wish to know the origins of the metric system, there is one place to turn: the official account composed by one of the leaders of the meridian expedition, the north-going astronomer, Jean-Bap. The men who created the metric system understood this. Alder retraced the route of Jean-Baptiste Joseph Delambre and Pierre François André Mechain on a bicycle and succeeded in solving an authentic 200-year-old mystery about a mistake made and covered up by Mechain, but very little of that energy or excitement survives the subdued, soporific intonations of reader Jennings. Hardcover with no dust jacket. But behind the public triumph of the metric system lies a long and bitter history. But behind the public triumph of the metric system lies a long and bitter history.

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Audio Book Review: THE MEASURE OF ALL THINGS: The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

Just as the French Revolution had proclaimed universal rights for all people, the savants argued, so too should it proclaim universal measures. As acclaimed historian and novelist Ken Alder discovered through his research, there were only two people on the planet who knew the full extent of this error: Delambre and Méchain themselves. But in the end, it was science that was forever changed. To do their job, standards must operate as a set of shared assumptions, the unexamined background against which we strike agreements and make distinctions. They began their journey in opposite directions, and then, when they had reached the extremities of their arc, measured their way back toward one another through a country quickened with revolution. Also distracting is his occasional use of a French accent often reminiscent of a Monty Python sketch. Yet when Ken Alder located the long-lost correspondence between the two men, along with their mission logbooks, he stumbled upon a two-hundred-year-old secret, and a drama worthy of the great French playwrights.

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The Measure of All Things: The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

Just balances, just weights, a just ephah, and a just hin, shall ye have. Starting in Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre would make his way north to Dunkirk, while Pierre-Francois-Andre Mechain voyaged south to Barcelona. Where Méchain conceived of error as a personal failure, his successors learned to tame it. At last, their seven years of travel done, the two astronomers converged on the southern fortress town of Carcassonne, and from there returned to Paris to present their data to an International Commission, the world's first international scientific conference. Measurement is one of our most ordinary actions.

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The measure of all things : the seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

The Measure of All Things is the astonishing story of one of history's greatest scientific quests, a mission to measure the Earth and define the meter for all nations and for all time. Pages are intact and are not marred by notes or highlighting, but may contain a neat previous owner name. Starting in Paris, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre would make his way north to Dunkirk, while Pierre-François-André Méchain voyaged south to Barcelona. Today, their goal seems within reach. Things might easily have turned out differently. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund.

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The Measure of All Things : The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

By turns a science history, detective tale, and human drama, The Measure of All Things describes a quest that succeeded as it failed—and continues to enlighten and inspire to this day. Synopsis In June 1792, amidst the chaos of the French Revolution, two intrepid astronomers set out in opposite directions on an extraordinary journey. The guilty knowledge of his error drove him to the brink of madness, and in the end, he died in an attempt to correct himself. Yet behind the public triumph of the metric system lies a secret error, one that is perpetuated in every subsequent definition of the meter. How do you set standards at a time when everything is up for grabs? Spine creases, wear to binding and pages from reading. But all the savants' grand plans would have remained fantasy had not the French Revolution -- history's great utopian rupture -- provided them with an unexpected chance to throw off the shackles of custom and build a new world upon principled foundations.

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The measure of all things : the seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

It was an operation of exquisite precision for such violent times. The erudite and cosmopolitan Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre made his way north from Paris, while the cautious and scrupulous Pierre-François-André Méchain made his way south. So it is not surprising that we take measurement for granted and consider it banal. Two hundred year later, historian Ken Alder discovered the truth. The audio versions of such recent bestselling books about measurement as Dava Sobel's Longitude and Simon Winchester's The Map That Changed the World have proved popular, but it's hard to imagine a similar fate for this dry, often arch reading of Alder's lively epic about the two 18th-century French astronomers who perfected the metric system. Indeed, as I discovered in the course of my research, the only people who could have known the full extent of this error were Delambre and Méchain themselves.

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The Measure of All Things : The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

Yet when Ken Alder located the long-lost correspondence between the two men, along with their mission logbooks, he stumbled upon a two-hundred-year-old secret, and a drama worthy of the great French playwrights. Simultaneous release with the Free Press hardcover Forecasts, July 1. It was a moment of triumph: proof that in the midst of social and political upheaval, science could produce something of permanence. Yet behind the public triumph of the metric system lies a secret error, one that is perpetuated in every subsequent definition of the meter. It was a time when scientists believed they could redefine the foundations of space and time, creating a thirty-day month, a ten-day week, and a ten-hour day.

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Audio Book Review: THE MEASURE OF ALL THINGS: The Seven

the measure of all things the seven year odyssey and hidden error that transformed the world

The Revolutionary scientists created the metric system two hundred years ago to avoid just this sort of fiasco. The audio versions of such recent bestselling books about measurement as Dava Sobel's Longitude and Simon Winchester's The Map That Changed the World have proved popular, but it's hard to imagine a similar fate for this dry, often arch reading of Alder's lively epic about the two 18th-century French astronomers who perfected the metric system. It also made it difficult for the savants to compare their results with those of their colleagues. Only then -- after the meter had already been publicly announced -- did his partner, Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre, discover the truth and face a fateful choice: what matters more, the truth or the appearance of the truth? It also made it difficult for the savants to compare their results with those of their colleagues. For seven years Delambre and Méchain traveled the meridian to extract this single number from the curved surface of our planet.

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