The man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly. The man on whom nothing was lost : the grand strategy of Charles Hill (Book, 2005) [automatictrade.net] 2019-03-09

The man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly Rating: 9,4/10 252 reviews

The Man on Whom Nothing was Lost

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

At times, her voice does indeed sound quite young. The result is a genre-busting book--one that charts the intricate relationship between biographer and subject, student and teacher, even as it illuminates a momentous period in American history. The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost is at once the biography of a political insider and the story of how its author evolved as she wrote it. Worthen's evolving relationship with her professor -- an account that is part bildungsroman, part detective story, part political history. This is her first book. Hill was best known at Yale for teaching along with Professors John Gaddis and Paul Kennedy a course known as the Grand Strategy seminar, a yearlong curriculum that, in Ms.

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The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost : The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill by Molly Worthen (2007, Paperback) for sale online

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

By searching for the full truth about her professor at the risk of complicating her initial hero worship, by incorporating his warts without losing sight of his wisdom, and by recording the evolution of her views about him in their entirety even the ones she admits to cringing at , she displays commendable courage, sobriety, and honesty--rare enough for someone at any age, but quite astonishing for one of hers. That being said, she does a much better job than I could have at a comparable age. As a Yale freshman, Worthen found herself deeply fascinated by worldly-wise professor Charles Hill, a former diplomat who had shaped American foreign policy in his forty-year career as an adviser to Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, among others. Hill's career as a diplomat and foreign policy adviser , it gives the reader an unusual angle on the roles that philosophy and personality can play in policy-making, while at the same time laying out a fascinating portrait of the relationship between a student and her teacher, who become biographer and subject. He also tried to be a human being, adopting two daughters from China and trying to make his restless wife happy during three centuries of upheaval. She transforms what might have been just an interesting story--the life of an obscure but powerful foreign service officer--into an elegant and perceptive meditation about the relationship between students and teachers, the morality of power and war, and the purpose of higher education.

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Worthen, Molly

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

As biographer, Worthen deftly describes the impact that Hill had on U. As a Yale freshman, Worthen found herself deeply fascinated by worldly-wise professor Charles Hill, a former diplomat who had shaped American foreign policy in his forty-year career as an adviser to Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, among others. This alone is worth the price of admission. The book is full of startling information based on painstaking research and interviews, and sheds fascinating light on life at one of the country's best universities. In the end, she was forced to reconcile the teacher she admired with the man she learned was brilliant, but fallible. Hill was never afraid to tell students how to think or what to do, and the Grand Strategy seminar he co-taught had developed a cult following.

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Molly Worthen, Michael Morgan

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

One such student, Molly Worthen, was so impressed that she decided to become Hill's biographer. Foreign Service in China during the Cultural Revolution, in Israel after the 1978 Accords, and in Saigon during the. We've all had a teacher, at one time or another, who showed us the world, clarified our fuzzy thinking, and made us grow up. She put Hill's classroom lessons to the ultimate test: she applied them to his own life. As a Yale freshman, Worthen found herself deeply fascinated by worldly-wise professor Charles Hill, a former diplomat who had shaped American foreign policy in his forty-year career as an adviser to Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, among others.

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Professor Bio Page

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

At Yale, Hill was never afraid to tell students how to think or what to do, and the Grand Strategy seminar he co-taught had developed a cult following. By interspersing her own experience of him as a teacher and mentor with his life story, she makes his and her story equally compelling. In weaving the personal and professional tale of Charles Hill, a backstage diplomat who became a revered professor, Molly Worthen has pulled together some profound themes: how foreign policy really works, how inner lives play out on public stages, and the concept of 145;grand strategy' as a way to understand international relations. I can't imagine a perspective being as interesting as Molly's. After taking a course on biography with Gaddis, she basically inherited a book deal, an office space at Yale and time to write the book on the mysterious Hill while earning her Ph. Hill was her professor, a former diplomat and behind-the-scenes operator who shaped American foreign policy in his forty-year career as an adviser to Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, among others. Cobb, an Episcopal priest, is to perform the ceremony at Christ Church New Haven, where he is the rector.

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The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost: The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill: Molly Worthen: 0046442872676: automatictrade.net: Books

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

His was a frigid way to live. She is also a national championship debater. At the time, people were very focused on this Yalie, Worthen, who became a protege of John Lewis Gaddis, the Cold War historian and contemporary of Hill. Charlie is a master of judicious ignorance. Times Book Review, April 9, 2006, Ross Douthat, review of The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost, p.

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The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost by Molly Worthen ยท OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

Molly Worthen graduated in 2003 from Yale University, where she wrote a prize-winning newspaper column and conducted an ethnographic study of Russian Orthodox old believers in Alberta. In a moving, highly original work, Worthen conveys the joy and the heartache of uncovering the human being behind ones idol. Hill served in the U. She has written numerous articles for newspapers and magazines and is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, where she covers religion, politics, and higher education. The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost is at once the biography of a political insider and the story of how its author evolved as she wrote it.

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The man on whom nothing was lost : the grand strategy of Charles Hill (Book, 2005) [automatictrade.net]

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

Worthen taught briefly at the University of Toronto before going to Chapel Hill in 2012. Contributor to periodicals, including Yale Daily News, Toledo Blade, Dallas Morning News, and Time. Her most recent book, Apostles of Reason, examines the history of American evangelicalism since 1945. At Yale, Hill was worldly-wise and never afraid to tell students how to think or what to do. He was one of the faceless bureaucrats who really run the world, but seldom end up in front of the cameras.

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Worthen, Molly

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

Hill was never afraid to tell students how to think or what to do, and the Grand Strategy seminar he co-taught had developed a cult following. Worthen was the first researcher to have access to what will surely become known as one of the most important documents of American foreign policy of the 20th century. She graduated magna cum laude from Yale. Impressive for a work which began during the author's undergraduate education. In doing so, she has not only created a novelistic portrait of an enigmatic man, but also raised important questions about the yearning, shared by some students and politicians alike, for certainty -- and the dangers of the Big Idea. Hill was never afraid to tell students how to think or what to do, and the Grand Strategy seminar he co-taught had developed a cult following. But above all this is a very personal and poignant account of what it's like to struggle to know someone you admire.

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The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost: The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill: Molly Worthen: 0046442872676: automatictrade.net: Books

the man on whom nothing was lost worthen molly

As a Yale freshman, Worthen found herself deeply fascinated by worldly-wise professor Charles Hill, a former diplomat who had shaped American foreign policy in his forty-year career as an adviser to Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, and Boutros Boutros-Ghali, among others. This is her first book. Worthen is goaded to reassess her and her fellow students' initial eagerness to embrace their professor as an exemplary role model, and to examine her own developing political and philosophical beliefs. I thought I would, too. National Review, March 13, 2006, Sarah Bramwell, review of The Man on Whom Nothing Was Lost, p.

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