Concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city. Concrete & Clay Reworking Nature in New York City: Matthew Gandy: Trade Paperback: 9780262572163: Powell's Books 2019-02-10

Concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city Rating: 6,8/10 1993 reviews

[PDF] Concrete And Clay Reworking Nature In New York City Urban And Industrial Environments

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

By examining, for example, how health issues embraced by such militant community groups as the Black Panthers and the Young Lords translated into environmental activism in the 1970s, and how an unlikely coalition between Latino and Hasidic activists against a proposed Brooklyn Navy Yard waste incinerator challenged and changed New York's community politics, Gandy deftly and provocatively connects issues of health, politics, economics and urbanology in a compulsively readable for the more wonkily inclined and illuminating cultural analysis. After all, exemplary leaders do not just emerge suddenly from nowhere to take charge of the prevailing situation. The framework is based upon three fundamental principles. Rather, the Court will provide a focus for national discussion and prioritization of such important issues as global climatic change, species extinction, soil erosion and genetic engineering. This article presents a strategic framework to guide public policy with respect to very long-term futures. Using the shifting meaning of nature under urbanization as a framework, he looks at how modern nature has been produced through interrelated transformations ranging from new water technologies to changing fashions in landscape design. Gandy has pieced together a fascinating environmental history of New York along five specific axes: the creation of a workable system of water supply, the developing concept of public space, the establishment of landscaped highways, the profound changes that environmentalism had on the Latino barrio in the 1960s and '70s, and environmentalism as a political movement.

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Project MUSE

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

What are the formative infuences that shape a great leader? The final chapter, about neighborhood resistance to a proposed waste incinerator, is more closely related to Gandy's environmentalist theme. It is likely authors of subsequent monographs will build upon the theoretical perspective Gandy developed in this account of capital, urban space, and nature in New York City. Integrated planning responses to overcoming the threats are proposed. Using the shifting meaning of nature under urbanization as a framework, he looks at how modern nature has been produced through interrelated transformations ranging from new water technologies to changing fashions in landscape design. But by the end, Gandy ties them all convincingly and neatly to issues in contemporary environmentalism.

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Concrete & Clay Reworking Nature in New York City: Matthew Gandy: Trade Paperback: 9780262572163: Powell's Books

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Drawing on political economy, environmental studies, social theory, cultural theory, and architecture, Gandy shows how New York's environmental history is bound up not only with the upstate landscapes that stretch beyond the city's political boundaries but also with more distant places that reflect the nation's colonial and imperial legacies. Instead, Gandy has written a lament over the unequal distribution of political power in an American city, one that recalls such works as Sam Bass Warner's Private City and Mike Davis's City of Quartz. Using the shifting meaning of nature under urbanization as a framework, he looks at how modern nature has been produced through interrelated transformations ranging from new water technologies to changing fashions in landscape design. The book traces five broad developments: the expansion and redefinition of public space, the construction of landscaped highways, the creation of a modern water supply system, the radical environmental politics of the barrio in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and the contemporary politics of the environmental justice movement. We all need heroes who can awaken the best in us and inspire us to be what we can be. Drawing on political economy, environmental studies, social theory, cultural theory, and architecture, Gandy shows how New York's environmental history is bound up not only with the upstate landscapes that stretch beyond the city's political boundaries but also with more distant places that reflect the nation's colonial and imperial legacies. Even in such a scattershot book, this chapter seems out of place.

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Project MUSE

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

He offers a dramatic new synthesis of what we know about New York City and the natural environment of water, waste, air, and parkland, framed by the continual struggle for democracy. The book traces five broad developments: the expansion and redefinition of public space, the construction of landscaped highways, the creation of a modern water supply system, the radical environmental politics of the barrio in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and the contemporary politics of the environmental justice movement. Missing is a clear statement of how infrastructure development could have been more democratic in the past. Forecast: As pundits, developers, administrators and activists enter the debate over what to do with the World Trade Center site and how to do it, this history of the city's politico-environmental nexus should find its way into many of their hands, particularly those concerned about the site's toxicity. Of the five chapters, the first three focus on public works projects firmly controlled by social and technical elites. Heightened New York interest continues outside the city; expect solid sales from campus and issue-oriented shops.

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Matthew Gandy

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Drawing on political economy, environmental studies, social theory, cultural theory, and architecture, Gandy shows how New York's environmental history is bound up not only with the upstate landscapes that stretch beyond the city's political boundaries but also with more distant places that reflect the nation's colonial and imperial legacies. Peter's College and School of Geography and the Environment, Oxford University Read more. Power, not nature, is the true subject of the book. The E-mail message field is required. Matthew Gandy applauds their work, but he does not follow their lead. Throughout, he considers the economic and ideological forces that underlie phenomena as diverse as the location of parks and the social stigma of dirty neighborhoods.

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Concrete and clay : reworking nature in New York City (eBook, 2002) [automatictrade.net]

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Contents: Water, Space, and Power -- Water and the Nascent Civic Realm -- Engineering the Technological Sublime -- Urban Decay and the Hidden City -- Paranoid Urbanism -- Hydrological Transformations -- Symbolic Order and the Urban Pastoral -- Cultural Anxiety, Land Speculation, and Public Space -- Creating the Garden of a Great City -- Olmsted's Urban Vision: A Fragile Synthesis -- Olmsted Rediscovered: An Emerging Preservationist Ethic -- Emerald Dreams -- Technological Modernism and the Urban Parkway -- The Automobilization of the American Landscape -- Robert Moses and the Radiant City -- The Demise of Technological Modernism -- Fractured Cities -- Between Borinquen and the Barrio -- Landscapes of Despair -- Space, Identity, and Power -- Disarray in the 1970s -- The Power of Memory -- Rustbelt Ecology -- Across the Great Divide -- Pollution and the Politics of Resistance -- Reclaiming the Social Environment -- Trash Can Utopias. In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Technology and Culture 44. Gandy uncovers the hidden intersections of nature, culture, and power on which the building of cities relies. By relentlessly bringing us back to the underlying patterns of capital accumulation and political power in cities, Gandy offers a powerful corrective to models of sustainability that invoke an organic ideal of urban nature. The anthropocene as a potential new unit of the international chronostratigraphic chart which serves as the basis of the geological time scale is assessed in terms. The Court will consist of a grand jury, made up of one citizen from each state, and the members of the Supreme Court.

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[PDF] Concrete And Clay Reworking Nature In New York City Urban And Industrial Environments

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Significant changes in economic, political and social theory and organization required to support the strategic responses are discussed. Even though each chapter has some connection to the physical environment of New York City, the focus on nature is only incidental, for stories of housing, schooling, or law-enforcement policy would fit just as well into Gandy's framework. Yet while he thrills to find cross-ethnic alliances, he acknowledges that the net effect of victory was merely to shift New York waste to poor communities in other states. There is simply not enough attention to nature's own rhythms to make this an environmental history of New York. Since most of the stories told here are familiar to urban historians, and since most of the chapters are based at least as much on recent secondary scholarship as on primary sources, Gandy seems to define his contribution not as new research but as original synthesis and argument. The Court will have no authority to force the implementation of any social programmes or agenda.

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Project MUSE

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Gandy terms the Lords environmentalists because they demanded better garbage collection as part of a wide-ranging program, but it is not clear that they thought of themselves as reworking nature. Threats to meeting the principles are assessed. In this paper a nonstatistical framework for assessing behaviorally based policy models is presented. Synopsis An interdisciplinary account of the environmental history and changing landscape of New York City. .

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Concrete and Clay: Reworking Nature in New York City * Suburban Alchemy: 1960s New Towns and the Transformation of the American Dream

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

Artists flock to this region for its awe inspiring natural beauty this brand new festival showcases artistic inspirations that raise awareness of the pristine. Drawing on political economy, environmental studies, social theory, cultural theory, and architecture, Gandy shows how New York's environmental history is bound up not only with the upstate landscapes that stretch beyond the city's political boundaries but also with more distant places that reflect the nation's colonial and imperial legacies. It will meet at least once every five years. In his city, water, trees, and microbes are nothing more than the objects of human control, not independent forces or parts of a larger ecosystem. Using the shifting meaning of nature under urbanization as a framework, he looks at how modern nature has been produced through interrelated transformations ranging from new water technologies to changing fashions in landscape design. We like to keep things fresh. Drawing on political economy, environmental studies, social theory, cultural theory, and architecture, Gandy shows how New York's environmental history is bound up not only with the upstate landscapes that stretch beyond the city's political boundaries but also with more distant places that reflect the nation's colonial and imperial legacies.

Next

Concrete and clay : reworking nature in New York City (eBook, 2002) [automatictrade.net]

concrete and clay reworking nature in new york city

The book traces five broad developments: the expansion and redefinition of public space, the construction of landscaped highways, the creation of a modern water supply system, the radical environmental politics of the barrio in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and the contemporary politics of the environmental justice movement. New York has attempted to balance progress with health, safety and aesthetics during the course of its development, argues Gandy, a scholar in geography and urban studies at the University College of London. The framework assumes models have five elements: behavior specificity, motivation or goal specificity, decision-heuristic specificity, belief specificity, and exogenous variable specificity. After the elements have been defined, three models are assessed using the framework. Such a framework is needed because statistical criteria do not explicitly indicate how well various aspects of a disaggregated model fit together.

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